Youth groups against dating violence

09-Nov-2016 00:02 by 4 Comments

Youth groups against dating violence

New Media Impact on Teen Dating Violence While dating violence can include physical, emotional, and psychological harm, a new theme is now emerging in the literature on dating violence with respect to psychological abuse using electronic technologies, including cell phones and social media, i.e. While most of the literature on the use of these technologies for interpersonal abuse among teens still focuses on peer abuse and bullying, attention is growing to their specific uses in dating-related emotional abuse.

The workshops focused several different aspects of teen dating violence including: power and control in teen dating relationships; Recognizing tactics that abusers use to maintain power and control; Naming qualities of a healthy relationship.It can happen to of any gender, race, age, sexual orientation, religion, profession, education, or socioeconomic background (though women are much more likely than men to be victimized), and within couples who are married, living together, or dating.In short, domestic violence affects the health of individuals, families, and communities.The results of the project will help to ensure that prevention and intervention efforts can incorporate language and conceptualizations of relationships that youth can relate.Further, the findings will educate youth about dangerous behaviors that they may not have previously considered negative or abusive.October is National Domestic Violence Awareness month, which was first observed in 1987 by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence in order to raise awareness and education efforts for domestic violence, as well as connect victims to resources.

Teen dating violence is an often-unrecognized subcategory of domestic violence.Unfortunately, teen dating violence—the type of intimate partner violence that occurs between two young people who are, or who were once in, an intimate relationship—is a serious problem in the United States.A national survey found that ten percent of teens, female and male, had been the victims of physical dating violence within the past year and can increase the risk of physical injury, poor academic performance, binge drinking, suicide attempts, unhealthy sexual behaviors, substance abuse, negative body image and self-esteem, and violence in future relationships.Adult intimate-partner violence and marital abuse have gained more recognition, as seen, especially in the past three decades, in policy, program, and legal responses, and in an extensive research literature base devoted to the problem.Adolescents, by comparison, have been long overlooked as a population that suffers from relationship abuse.Finally, they will include recommendations for how to incorporate the findings into planning of programmatic activities and research agendas in the area of teen dating violence that will help to encourage future programs and efforts in the prevention of teen dating violence.