Validating regular expression

10-Aug-2015 10:39 by 2 Comments

Validating regular expression

Regular expressions are a good way to validate text fields such as names, addresses, phone numbers, and other user information. A regular expression can easily check whether a user entered something that looks like a valid phone number.

The following example shows backreferencing in a regular expression: (\b[A-Za-z] )[ ]

The following example shows backreferencing in a regular expression: (\b[A-Za-z] )[ ] \1 This code matches text that contains a word that is repeated twice; that is, it matches a word (specified by the \b word boundary special character and the “[A-Za-z] )” followed by one or more spaces (specified by “[ ] ”), followed by the first matched subexpression, the first word, in parentheses. It works well for fully qualified URL, but doesnt work if we use URL without http or https That is it validates: but not validates com what i need is that in addition to current behaviour, it validates the url not having http specifying, that is it should validate com too Thanks Friends Manish Sadhwani if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). or, see this url should work for most regex processors:/((? Followed by at least one or more valid domain characters (a-z, 0-9, or -)Matches without case sensitivity (/i)It does not enforce white space, so it will match this: blah and return you want to enforce space, add \s to the beginning, but then you have to ensure that you add a space to the beginning of the string to match. They can be replaced with matching groups () if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). You can concatenate simple regular expressions into complex search criteria to validate against complex patterns, such as any of several words with different endings.You can use Cold Fusion variables and functions in regular expressions.For information on regular expressions used in Cold Fusion functions, see Using Regular Expressions in Functions.

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The following example shows backreferencing in a regular expression: (\b[A-Za-z] )[ ] \1 This code matches text that contains a word that is repeated twice; that is, it matches a word (specified by the \b word boundary special character and the “[A-Za-z] )” followed by one or more spaces (specified by “[ ] ”), followed by the first matched subexpression, the first word, in parentheses.

It works well for fully qualified URL, but doesnt work if we use URL without http or https That is it validates: but not validates com what i need is that in addition to current behaviour, it validates the url not having http specifying, that is it should validate com too Thanks Friends Manish Sadhwani if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones).

or, see this url should work for most regex processors:/((? Followed by at least one or more valid domain characters (a-z, 0-9, or -)Matches without case sensitivity (/i)It does not enforce white space, so it will match this: blah and return you want to enforce space, add \s to the beginning, but then you have to ensure that you add a space to the beginning of the string to match. They can be replaced with matching groups () if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones).

You can concatenate simple regular expressions into complex search criteria to validate against complex patterns, such as any of several words with different endings.

You can use Cold Fusion variables and functions in regular expressions.

For information on regular expressions used in Cold Fusion functions, see Using Regular Expressions in Functions.

This code matches text that contains a word that is repeated twice; that is, it matches a word (specified by the \b word boundary special character and the “[A-Za-z] )” followed by one or more spaces (specified by “[ ] ”), followed by the first matched subexpression, the first word, in parentheses. It works well for fully qualified URL, but doesnt work if we use URL without http or https That is it validates: but not validates com what i need is that in addition to current behaviour, it validates the url not having http specifying, that is it should validate com too Thanks Friends Manish Sadhwani if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). or, see this url should work for most regex processors:/((? Followed by at least one or more valid domain characters (a-z, 0-9, or -)Matches without case sensitivity (/i)It does not enforce white space, so it will match this: blah and return you want to enforce space, add \s to the beginning, but then you have to ensure that you add a space to the beginning of the string to match. They can be replaced with matching groups () if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). You can concatenate simple regular expressions into complex search criteria to validate against complex patterns, such as any of several words with different endings.You can use Cold Fusion variables and functions in regular expressions.For information on regular expressions used in Cold Fusion functions, see Using Regular Expressions in Functions.

Because special characters are the operators in regular expressions, to represent a special character as an ordinary one, escape it by preceding it with a backslash.Before explaining the sample I would like to provide a little explanation of Regular Expressions.Regular Expression Regular Expressions are specially formatted strings for specifying patterns in text.Also, next time, you might want to include the programming language or context, because regex processors vary greatly in feature support. I developed this by little trial and error and covers u r scenario.... The validation succeeds only if the user input matches the pattern.