Seeking arrangements dating service

08-Jan-2015 01:34 by 4 Comments

Seeking arrangements dating service - uc berkeley dating scene

Since I was still a bit hesitant about how far I’d be willing to take my experiment, I signed up using the pseudonym Annabelle Walker.

That would be enough to cover my living expenses and leave me with thousands in disposable income.

Unsurprisingly, Hank made a move on me, and I kissed him for a split second before withdrawing abruptly. I sensed that he wanted a puppet more than a girlfriend, and no amount of gifts or pampering could compensate for having to deal with such a controlling person.

So I scrambled to the front door—thankfully, it was unlocked—and bid Hank good riddance.

The rest of Hank’s profile, which told me that he was middle-aged, played sports, and worked in finance, was of less interest.

We set up a date and specified what we’d be wearing so that we could recognize each other—a navy-blue baby-doll dress and black tights for me, a striped button-down and a maroon cashmere vest for him.

We were at Megu, a pricey Japanese restaurant in Midtown Manhattan, eating perfectly cooked Kobe beef.

My companion, a wealthy finance type, was telling me all about himself and posing questions that suggested he was interested in me.

Why sneer at suspected gold diggers like Heather Mills or the late Anna Nicole Smith if they were merely following their evolutionary instincts?

With all of this in mind, I created my Seeking Arrangement profile.

If I had a hefty allowance from a generous benefactor, though, I figured that I could take the leap comfortably. To overcome my reservations about walking the line between dating and prostitution, I told myself that any such concerns were the result of societal conditioning.

The idea of wealthy older people supporting struggling younger ones is nothing revolutionary, after all—look what Peggy Guggenheim did for Jackson Pollock or the Tuohys did for N. The idea that mixing money and mating is inherently bad, I reasoned, was a fallacy based on our collective obsession with moralizing sex.

Mating rituals involving the exchange of gifts—be they hunks of meat, small fishes, or diamond rings—are ingrained in many species, from apes to seabirds, to humans.