Mature cam registered

01-Aug-2016 22:36 by 3 Comments

Mature cam registered

To farm effectively and efficiently, growers must put out the right number of bees.

About 85-90 of them are commercial, with about 50 involved in migratory pollination as their primary business., are the most intensively managed solitary bee species in the world."Solitary" doesn’t mean that they live entirely alone.Growers place alfalfa leafcutter bees in the fields as pre-pupae: mature larvae in the small leaf-wrapped cells that you see in the photographs.It takes about 20,000 bees per acre to get a good yield, but bees are expensive and too many bees can actually decrease yields by competing with each other and collecting too much pollen.You may see some with bright dots; these are bee larvae that have died of chalkbrood, a deadly fungus that forms very dense reproductive spores –the bright dots– when it matures.

Some will have numerous smaller larvae inside instead of one large baby bee.You can see on the x-ray that most of the cells are healthy mature larvae.They are plump and full of water, making them a bright white on the x-ray. Some are a less-dense gray color; these are larvae that have died and begun to dry out.They are a much more efficient pollinator of alfalfa and a few related crops than are honeybees.Fields with managed populations of alfalfa leafcutter bees usually produce two or three times the number of seed that fields without managed bees present do.Alfalfa leafcutter bees will tolerate being in quite close quarters with each other, but each female tends her own nest.